Student Achievement

Student success is an integral part of the mission of College of Charleston. The emphasis on student success is consistent with the statutory mandates and directives of the South Carolina Department of Administration and the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. The institution evaluates sucess with respect to student achievement consistent with its mission.

 

Goal 1: Four-Year and Six-Year Graduation Rates (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: For students enrolling as degree-seeking undergraduates, the College’s four-year graduation rate will exceed 50% and the College’s six-year graduation rate will exceed 60%.  

Student Achievement: The College’s four-year graduation rate (see Table 1) for the past ten years has ranged from 51.9% to 61.6%, while the six-year graduation rate has ranged from 64.5% to 71.4%. As compared to peer institutions in South Carolina, based on the 2012 entering freshmen cohort, the six-year graduation rate of the College of Charleston (see Figure 1) was 71%,  the fourth highest among South Carolina public universities and 1% lower than the Citadel (72%), 6% lower than University of South Carolina-Columbia (77%) and 12% lower than Clemson University (83%). Table 2 presents additional data regarding the six-year graduation rate for entering cohort 2012 by race/ethnicity and gender, as recently requested by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.

Table 1. Graduation Rates of New Full-Time Freshmen: Entering Cohort Fall 2006 to Fall 2015.

Figure 1

Note: The six-year graduation rates of the entering cohorts term Fall 2014 and Fall 2015 are not available yet and will be updated once they are available. *N represents the entering cohort's enrollment population. Data source: Office of Institutional Research.

Figure 1. South Carolina Six-Year Graduation Rates for Freshmen Entering 2012.

Figure 2

Note: 2012 represents Academic Year (AY) 2012-2013. Data Source: Office of Institutional Research.

 

Table 2: Six-Year Graduation Rate by gender, race and socioeconomic status for cohort year 2012.

Table 2: Six-Year Graduation Rate by Gender and Race/Ethnicity for 2012 Cohort.

 

Note: 2012 represents Academic Year (AY) 2012-2013. Data source: Office of Institutional Research.

Table 2 presents the six-year graduation rate by race/ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status (Pell Grant recipients) for the 2012 freshmen cohort. Regardless of race and gender, the six-year graduation rate is 71%. By gender, females’ six-year graduation rate is 73%, 6% higher than males (67%). By race/ethnicity, White students’ six-year graduation rate is 72%, Black or African American 73%, Asian 76%, Hispanic 65%, Nonresident alien 73%, American Indian or Alaska Native 100%, two or more races 63%, and race unknown 71%. By socioeconomic status, Pell Grant recipients hold a six-year graduation rate of 66% compared to 74% for students who did not receive Pell Grants or Stafford Loans.

 

Goal 2: Employment Rate for Graduates (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: The College’s institutional goal is that at least 75% of new graduates of baccalaureate programs will be employed one year after graduation.

Student Achievement: Figure 2 presents data from the College’s Senior Exit Survey, a survey assessing senior students’ career outcomes and academic experiences administered during the graduation rehearsal. Figure 3 provides data from the annual First Destination Undergraduate Survey, a one-year post graduation survey administered through Qualtrics. The data from these two surveys indicate that the employment rate of graduating seniors ranged from 21% in Academic Year 2015-16 to 57.3% in AY 2018-19, but the employment rate of graduates one year after graduation has increased from 68% (in multiple years: AY 2013-14, AY 2015-16, AY 2016-17 and AY 2017-18) to 80.56% in AY 2018-19, which is 5% higher than the institutional goal of 75%.

Figure 2. Employment Status Following Graduation

Figure 3

Note: Employment category includes full-time, part-time, self-employed, multiple jobs and military service. Data source: Senior Exit Survey, administered by the Office for Institutional Effectiveness.

Figure 3. Employment Status One-Year After Graduation.

Figure 4

Note: Employment category Includes full-time, part-time, self-employed, multiple jobs and military service. Data source: First Destination Undergraduate Survey (One-Year) administered by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

Goal 3: Number of Graduates Who Continued Their Education (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: The College’s institutional goal is that at least 20% of new undergraduate degree recipients will be enrolled in a graduate, professional, or other educational program one year after graduation.

Student Achievement: As shown in Figure 4, the percentage of graduating seniors who pursued a graduate, professional and other educational program for the past five academic years ranged from 12% in 2013-2014 to 24.13% in AY 2018-19.  Further, the percentage of new undergraduate degree recipients who enrolled in a graduate, professional, or other educational program one year after graduation (Figure 5) for the past five academic years ranged from 38% in AY 2013-14 to 20.43% in AY 2017-18. Table 3 presents the additional data from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which indicates that 39 Bachelor’s recipients who graduated from the College of Charleston received doctorate degrees in AY 2018-19.

Figure 4. Graduate Education Status Following Graduation.

 Figure 5

 

Data source: Senior Exit Survey administered by the Office for Institutional Effectiveness.

Figure 5. Graduate Education Status One-Year After Graduation.

Figure 6

 

Data Source: First Destination Undergraduate Survey (One-Year), administered by the Office for Institutional Effectiveness.

Table 3. The Number of Doctorates by Baccalaureate Institution from the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED).

table 3

Note: AY 2009 represents Academic Year 2009-10. *Professional degress such as the M.D., D.D.S, O.D., D.V.M., and J.D. are not covered by the Survey of Earned Doctorates. **Denotes academic institutions that offer doctoral degrees.  Source: National Science Foundation's Integrated Science and Engineering Resources Data System (webcaspar.nsf.gov).

Goal 4: Employer Feedback on Graduates (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: When available, employer feedback will indicate a favorable assessment of the performance and/or preparation of College of Charleston students.

Student Achievement: Overwhelmingly, as shown in Table 4, employers favorably rated the College’s graduates on a series of skills and abilities. Specifically, 70% of employers surveyed in the Alumni Employer Survey 2015 rated graduates from the College of Charleston as either “Good” or “Excellent” in terms of the ability to work independently; 69% of employer surveyed rated “Good” or “Excellent” in terms of graduates’ professionalism and 68% of employers surveyed made the same ratings in graduates’ ability to work in teams.

Table 4. The College of Charleston Alumni Employee's Ability Level.

table 4

Note: the most recent employer survey was conducted in 2015. This table will be updated once the newest data are available. Data source: Office for Institutional Effectiveness. 

 Goal 5: Scores of Graduates on Post-undergraduate Examinations (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: Advanced students or recent graduates who complete post-undergraduate examinations will earn scores consistent with or better than those earned by relevant peer groups, when peer data are available, or will show evidence of significant improvement or achievement relative to an appropriate baseline (e.g., at least 10% improvement in achievement between the freshman and senior years).  

Student Achievement: As shown below in Table 5, the ETS results showed seniors at the College of Charleston scored more than 10% than the Carnegie class in 2012, 2015 and 2018 in Reading level 1 (11% more than the Carnegie class in 2018, 13% in 2015 and 16 in 2012), Reading level 2 (11% more than Carnegie class in 2018 and 17% more in 2015 and 27% more in 2012), Writing level 1 (15% more than Carnegie class, 15 more in 2015 and 14% more in 2012, Writing level 2 ( 15% more than Carnegie class in 2018, 13% more in 2015 and 12% more in 2012), Mathematics level 1 ( 16% more than Carnegie class in 2018, 18% more in 2015 and 25% more in 2012) and Mathematics level 2 (19% more than Carnegie class in 2018, 19% more in 2015 and 21% in 2012). As shown in Table 6 the SC Praxis Traditional Assessment pass rates of students at the College of Charleston ranged from 94% (AY 2016-17) to 99% (AY 2015-16), 3% lower and 1% higher than the statewide average pass rates, respectively.

Table 5. ETS Proficiency Profile Results-Seniors-Percent Proficient (2012, 2015, 2018)

table 5

Note: 2012 represents Academic Year 2011-2012 since ETS took place in Spring. Data source: Office for Institutional Effectiveness. 

Table 6. SC Praxis Traditional Assessment Pass Rates for All Completers (AY 2012-13 to AY 2017-18).

table 6

Note: In cases where there are less than ten students taking the assessment or license/certificate, the number of passing and pass rates are not reported. *Number of completers taking one or more assessments within their area of specialization. **Summary level "Number Taking Assessment" may differ from assessment level " Number Taking Assessment" because each student is counted once at the summary level but may be counted in multiple assessments at the assessment level. Data source:Office of Institutional Research.

Goal 6: Credit Hours Earned of Graduates (S.C. Performance Indicator)

Institutional Goal: For students who entered the College of Charleston as freshmen, the College’s mean number of credit hours earned for a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree will not exceed 134 hours (i.e., 10% over and above the minimum 122 credit hours required to earn the degree). Students earning double majors, second majors, or second degrees (including the A.B.) are excluded from measurements relevant to this goal.  

Student Achievement: as shown in Table 7, for the past nine academic years, the average credit hours of bachelor’s recipients with a B.A. degree from the College of Charleston was 128.43, which was 5.57 credit hours lower than the cutoff credits of 134 hours. Similarly, the average credit hours of bachelor’s recipients with a B.S. degree from the College of Charleston was 132.61, which was 1.39 credit hours lower than the cutoff credits of 134 hours. It is thereby concluded that this institutional goal has been met in Goal 6.

Table 7. Average Credit Hours to Graduation

table 7

Goal 7: Undergraduate Retention Rates (College of Charleston Indicator)

Institutional Goal: For students enrolling as degree-seeking undergraduates, the College’s first-to-second year retention of first-time, full-time freshmen will consistently exceed 80%.

Student Achievement: As Figure 6 indicates, the College’s one-year retention rate of full-time freshmen was consistently above 80% from 2012 to 2013 and decreased slightly below 80% in 2014 and to 2018. The most current one-year retention rate is 81.1% in AY 2019-20.

Figure 6. College of Charleston One-Year Retention Rate from AY 2012-13 to AY 2019-2020.

figure 6

Note: 2012 represents Academic Year 2012-13. For academic year 2012-13, the entering year was academic year 2011-12, and the retention rate for 2011-12 cohort was 81.4%. Data course: Office of Institutional Research.

Goal 8: Degrees Awarded (College of Charleston Indicator)

Institutional Goal: Between 2010-2020, the College of Charleston will increase the total number of undergraduate and graduate degrees awarded by 5%.

Student Achievement: The total number of undergraduate degrees awarded in AY 2019-20 was 2,399, which was 0.8% higher than the total in AY 2010-11 (total=2,380)(Figure 7). As for graduate degrees awarded by the College of Charleston(Figure 8), the total number of graduate degrees in AY 2019-20 was 238 that was 3.25% lower than the total in AY 2010-11 (total=246).

Figure 7. Undergraduate Degrees Awarded (AY 2007-08 to AY 2018-19).

figure 7

Note: in Figure 7 and Figure 8 below, 2008 represented AY 2007-08 as defined by IPEDS (The Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System). Data source: Office of Institutional Research.

Figure 8. Graduate Degrees Awarded (AY 2007-08 to AY 2018-19).figure 8

Data source: Office of Institutional Research.

 

Goal 9: Time to Degree Completion (College of Charleston Indicator)

Institutional Goal: The College’s institutional goal for time to undergraduate degree completion will be a mean of 4.2 years and a median of 4.0 years, for all students who enter the College as freshmen.  

Student Achievement: The average time to undergraduate degree completion at the College of Charleston since AY 2010-11 for all students who entered the College as freshmen ranged from 4.17 in AY 2017-18 to 4.23 in AY 2016-17 with a median of 4 years, as shown in Table 8. Therefore, this institutional goal was met.

Table 8. Time to Degree Completion

table 8

Note: The mean and median are calculated on years to graduation up to and including eight years. Data Source: Office of Institutional Research.

Goal 10: Course Completion Rates (College of Charleston Indicator)

Institutional Goal: The College of Charleston should have DFW (drop-fail-withdrawal) rates at or below 15% for undergraduate course enrollments in an academic year.  

Student Achievement: For the past five academic years from AY 2014-15 to AY 2018-19, as shown in Figure 9, the DFW rate has been kept below 15%. Specifically, the DFW rate ranged from 12% in AY 2014-15 to 12.9% in AY 2017-18 and AY 2018-19. Thus, the data show that the goal that the College of Charleston should have DFW (drop-fail-withdrawal) rates at or below 15% for undergraduate course enrollments in an academic year has been met.

Figure 9. The College of Charleston DFW Rates

figure 9Notes: Grades given where quality hours do not contribute to a student's GPA are excluded from this report.  Data source: Office of Institutional Research.